tirade


tirade
tirade, *diatribe, jeremiad, philippic can all mean a violent, often long-winded, and usually denunciatory speech or writing. Tirade implies a swift emission of heated language, sometimes critical, sometimes abusive, but usually long-continued and directed against persons or things that the speaker or writer believes worthy of castigation
{

screaming a tirade of protest and rage— Davenport

}
{

the King . . . had ... to impose silence on the tirades which were delivered from the University pulpit— J. R. Green

}
Diatribe carries a stronger implication of bitterness and, often, of long-windedness than tirade
{

a rambling, bitter diatribe on the wrongs and sufferings of the laborers— Kingsley

}
{

a diatribe in some . . . paper which neglected to mention what I had said, it merely indicated that it had been awful— Mailer

}
Jeremiad stresses the implication of dolefulness or lugubriousness, but it usually applies to a diatribe in that strain
{

a jeremiad against a civilization that values knowledge above wisdom— Durrell

}
Philippic applies to an oration or harangue that constitutes a denunciatory attack filled with acrimonious invective and often directed against a public person, a way of life, an aggressive power, or some dictatorial assumption
{

gave full rein to his mingled exasperation and boredom in a philippic so withering that it roused a lethargic Senate— S. H. Adams

}
{

delivered a violent philippic against democracy— S. R. L.

}
Analogous words: harangue, oration, *speech: invective, vituperation, *abuse: denunciation, censure, condemnation (see corresponding verbs at CRITICIZE)
Antonyms: eulogy

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • tirade — [ tirad ] n. f. • 1610; h. XVe; de tirer 1 ♦ Développement continu et assez long (d une même idée). « Des tirades d amour conjugal » (Laclos). Développement littéraire. 2 ♦ (1672) Longue suite de phrases, de vers, récitée sans interruption par un …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Tirade — Sf Wortschwall per. Wortschatz fremd. Erkennbar fremd (18. Jh.) Entlehnung. Entlehnt aus frz. tirade, dieses aus it. tirata, Abstraktum zu it. tirare ziehen , aus früh rom. * tirare. So benannt als langgezogenes Reden .    Ebenso nndl. tirade, ne …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

  • tirade — Tirade. s. f. Suite de discours. Il y a de belles tirades dans ce panegirique. il nous a dit une belle tirade de son poëme. il ne luy respondit que par une tirade d injures, par une tirade de sottises. On dit adv. Tout d une tirade, pour dire,… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • Tirade — Ti*rade , n. [F., fr. It. tirada, properly, a pulling; hence, a lengthening out, a long speech, a tirade, fr. tirare to draw; of Teutonic origin, and akin to E. tear to redn. See {Tear} to rend, and cf. {Tire} to tear.] A declamatory strain or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Tirade — (v. ital. Tirada), 1) lange Reihe von Worten, Wortschwall, rednerische Ausschmückung, welche die Rede ohne Noth sehr verlängert; 2) Spiel u. Verzierungsmanier, welche aus mehren neben einander stehenden, geschwinden Noten bestehen, welche den… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • tirade — (n.) 1801, a volley of words, from Fr. tirade speech, volley, shot, continuation, drawing out (16c.), from tirer draw out, endure, suffer, or the Fr. word is perhaps from cognate It. tirata a volley, from pp. of tirare to draw. The whole Romanic… …   Etymology dictionary

  • tirade — Tirade, Ronsard. Amour archer d une tirade rompt cent traicts sur moy …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • Tirade — (franz.), ein deklamationsartiger Worterguß, weitschweifiger Wortschwall, von den Franzosen auch im Sinne des alten Laisse (s. d.) gebraucht; in der Musik eine Gesangsverzierung, Läuferpassage …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Tirade — Tirāde (frz.), lang ausgedehnte, schwülstige Wortreihe, Wortschwall; in der Musik s.v.w. Passage …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • Tirade — Tirade, ital. deutsch, Reihe von auf und absteigenden Tönen, die der Sänger zur Verzierung anbringt; in der Redekunst die unnöthige, weitschweifige Ausführung eines Gedankens …   Herders Conversations-Lexikon